All Of My Vinyl turned 1 today!

All Of My Vinyl turned 1 today!

(Source: assets)

127. Jackson Browne - Running On Empty
This is an album that reminds me of long car trips. It’s not because of the obvious choice of the cover, or the fact that all the songs reference the road/being on tour. My parents would bring this album when we would travel to North Carolina. Perhaps they were being a bit on the nose by picking this to bring along with them? To me, I was just glad to get a break from hearing that same Barry Manilow record torture me as we drove 16 hours from New York to North Carolina. I grew to really love this album as something kind of fun to just listen to. I probably loved the imagery of being on the road, and thinking about how fun it would be to be on tour as a musician (something I still daydream about). As a recording/audio geek, I love the fact that this entire record was recorded live on stage, soundchecks, hotel rooms, and even their tour bus. I now love the imagery of them hauling 4-track recorders into the Holiday Inn just to demo songs. There’s a lot to digest here, and as I listen to it now, I’m immediately transported to hauling down I-95 on a summer day. Not a bad memory to have.

127. Jackson Browne - Running On Empty

This is an album that reminds me of long car trips. It’s not because of the obvious choice of the cover, or the fact that all the songs reference the road/being on tour. My parents would bring this album when we would travel to North Carolina. Perhaps they were being a bit on the nose by picking this to bring along with them? To me, I was just glad to get a break from hearing that same Barry Manilow record torture me as we drove 16 hours from New York to North Carolina. I grew to really love this album as something kind of fun to just listen to. I probably loved the imagery of being on the road, and thinking about how fun it would be to be on tour as a musician (something I still daydream about). As a recording/audio geek, I love the fact that this entire record was recorded live on stage, soundchecks, hotel rooms, and even their tour bus. I now love the imagery of them hauling 4-track recorders into the Holiday Inn just to demo songs. There’s a lot to digest here, and as I listen to it now, I’m immediately transported to hauling down I-95 on a summer day. Not a bad memory to have.

126. Jack White - Blunderbuss

Every generation has their musical heroes. I find that I have many of these, but they just fill different aspects. There are those musicians that are down to earth, and make you believe that you can easily do what they are doing/why aren’t you doing this already. And then there’s the larger-then-life characters that achieve the “god” status. For me, that club is occupied by Jack White. There are very few rock stars today that keep their distance when it comes to interacting with the public. Twitter has made some of my favorite musicians accessible, and even enabled me to have conversations with them. Jack White is a different story. He purposely plays the “too cool” card. He keeps the air of mystery alive in his work; you don’t know what he is going to do next. You just don’t become a rock “god” unless you stay relatively inaccessible to the general public. I’m not saying that it’s the right way to go about it, I’m saying it’s one way. People can love Led Zeppelin and Fugazi just as much, and revere the personalities. Jack White has become the former, not the latter, and likely by design.

Recently Jack White had a bit of a meltdown on stage that made the news. He walked off stage early because he was frustrated with the crowd at the very posh Radio City Music Hall. (Personally I think it was because a few blocks uptown he wasn’t invited to the gigantic “charity” show that included his sworn enemy The Black Keys, and one of his heroes Neil Young). But it was so refreshing to see a musician in a controversy that didn’t involve them talking shit on Twitter. By today’s standards, he created this controversy in such an old school way. Again, the “god” theory.

This copy is a bit of an odd one. It’s called an “inverted lightening bolt” version that Third Man Records had out for a very short time (and apparently is very rare!). At first you think that this record is scuffed! But fear not, it was meant to be this way. The record is flawless back to front, and keeps me excited for whatever the evil genius that is Jack White decides to do next. One day I hope to make it to Nashville to visit his palace, a unique store in an age where you need to be unique to survive.

125. J Mascis - Several Shades Of Why

When this record came out, I was really into it. It was the Winter of 2011, and I was up at college as a music director. I loved picturing the shredding power of Mr. Mascis, with a wall of amps behind him, putting the electric down, sitting in a chair, and shredding on an acoustic because he could. This record soundtracked most of that cold winter as I walked through campus, and drove around town. That year I was lucky enough to see him do most of these songs at the Sub Pop CMJ showcase. J Mascis is a guitar wizard who looks like one.

124. Iron & Wine - The Creek Drank The Cradle
When I was a freshman in High School, that movie Garden State came out. From there, it sent me on a journey of many new albums to check out. Iron & Wine was one of them, helping turn me into a guy who was really into hushed, sensitive “indie-folk” music. Now while I’ve adjusted myself to more “rock” oriented music, this isn’t something that makes it out of the shelf and onto the platter, but I’m glad that this was in my life, to help shape my tastes to newer music.

124. Iron & Wine - The Creek Drank The Cradle

When I was a freshman in High School, that movie Garden State came out. From there, it sent me on a journey of many new albums to check out. Iron & Wine was one of them, helping turn me into a guy who was really into hushed, sensitive “indie-folk” music. Now while I’ve adjusted myself to more “rock” oriented music, this isn’t something that makes it out of the shelf and onto the platter, but I’m glad that this was in my life, to help shape my tastes to newer music.

123. Hüsker Dü - Flip Your Wig
This year in May, the band I drum in called Mad Mule, played at a record fair in Nyack, New York. It was a particularly special moment for me, because we were playing at a place that on Friday nights in the mid 00’s, would become an all ages venue, where local and touring punk bands would play. I went to a whole bunch of shows there, saw a lot of stuff that I liked, and bunch I didn’t, but was thankful to be out of the house on a Friday night, seeing music with some friends. I only played there once at an open mic when I was 16, doing covers with my friend Duncan.

Besides that time, and singing with a friend’s band on one song in 2007, I never got the chance to play for a long time on that stage. When I found out that I was going to playing on stage for this record fair, I got a little bit emotional. I was finally getting my chance to rock out on stage at the Backdoor.
Mad Mule played our typical “we’re unprepared for this” typed show, where we didn’t really have a setlist, peppered in a few covers, including a cover of “Heroin” for the guy in a Velvet Underground shirt.

To date, it’s been the last show Mad Mule has played, but I’m sure there will be another eventually. We just take our time now. Anyway, the best part about playing at a record fair, is that after you play you can shop for records! So I would show up to a table, and the person selling already knew what you like, because they just saw your band. I wore a Stiff records shirt, advertising what I was probably looking for. This one guy handed me this record, Flip Your Wig. He said, “I can tell you like Hüsker Dü, right?” I told him, of course I did. He gave me half off this original SST pressing in mint condition, as well as some other records, that I’ll eventually write about in this blog! But that was the best part about that record fair, after we played, any table you walked up to, they handed you things you probably were a fan of. I had a hard time turning down a Sonic Youth test pressing, but ultimately had to. I got a ton of amazing singles from this British guy, who told me straight up, “No Stiffs here, sorry.” 

123. Hüsker Dü - Flip Your Wig

This year in May, the band I drum in called Mad Mule, played at a record fair in Nyack, New York. It was a particularly special moment for me, because we were playing at a place that on Friday nights in the mid 00’s, would become an all ages venue, where local and touring punk bands would play. I went to a whole bunch of shows there, saw a lot of stuff that I liked, and bunch I didn’t, but was thankful to be out of the house on a Friday night, seeing music with some friends. I only played there once at an open mic when I was 16, doing covers with my friend Duncan.

Duncan & Lowden, 2006

Besides that time, and singing with a friend’s band on one song in 2007, I never got the chance to play for a long time on that stage. When I found out that I was going to playing on stage for this record fair, I got a little bit emotional. I was finally getting my chance to rock out on stage at the Backdoor.

Mad Mule played our typical “we’re unprepared for this” typed show, where we didn’t really have a setlist, peppered in a few covers, including a cover of “Heroin” for the guy in a Velvet Underground shirt.

The Backdoor, 2013

To date, it’s been the last show Mad Mule has played, but I’m sure there will be another eventually. We just take our time now. Anyway, the best part about playing at a record fair, is that after you play you can shop for records! So I would show up to a table, and the person selling already knew what you like, because they just saw your band. I wore a Stiff records shirt, advertising what I was probably looking for. This one guy handed me this record, Flip Your Wig. He said, “I can tell you like Hüsker Dü, right?” I told him, of course I did. He gave me half off this original SST pressing in mint condition, as well as some other records, that I’ll eventually write about in this blog! But that was the best part about that record fair, after we played, any table you walked up to, they handed you things you probably were a fan of. I had a hard time turning down a Sonic Youth test pressing, but ultimately had to. I got a ton of amazing singles from this British guy, who told me straight up, “No Stiffs here, sorry.” 

122. History Of British Rock Volume 2
With odd compilations like this, I’m not entirely sure where to place them alphabetically within my collection, so I just started with the title. Anyway, much like the Bernie Taupin record, I got this record from the back of someone’s van when buying cymbals on craigslist. This record has some great tunes, including “Bus Stop” by The Hollies, and a personal favorite, “A Girl Like You” by The Troggs. The latter made it onto a mix I made for my girlfriend, and it became her favorite on the whole CD. I didn’t mind hearing that in the car all the time after that.

122. History Of British Rock Volume 2

With odd compilations like this, I’m not entirely sure where to place them alphabetically within my collection, so I just started with the title. Anyway, much like the Bernie Taupin record, I got this record from the back of someone’s van when buying cymbals on craigslist. This record has some great tunes, including “Bus Stop” by The Hollies, and a personal favorite, “A Girl Like You” by The Troggs. The latter made it onto a mix I made for my girlfriend, and it became her favorite on the whole CD. I didn’t mind hearing that in the car all the time after that.

121. Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass - Whipped Cream & Other Delights
I forget how I got this record, but I inherited it from somewhere. Apparently this album caused a bit of trouble in my mother’s family. Her father brought this home one day, and her mother had a fit about the very suggestive album cover. I’m sure this is an argument that happened quite a bit in it’s day. These days, it’s hardly shocking.

121. Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass - Whipped Cream & Other Delights

I forget how I got this record, but I inherited it from somewhere. Apparently this album caused a bit of trouble in my mother’s family. Her father brought this home one day, and her mother had a fit about the very suggestive album cover. I’m sure this is an argument that happened quite a bit in it’s day. These days, it’s hardly shocking.

120. The Head & The Heart - The Head & The Heart
Sub Pop sent this record to me for free during my music director days. While I appreciated the goodwill they sent my way, I was never a real big fan of this record, and thus, don’t really play it.

120. The Head & The Heart - The Head & The Heart

Sub Pop sent this record to me for free during my music director days. While I appreciated the goodwill they sent my way, I was never a real big fan of this record, and thus, don’t really play it.

119. Hanson - Now Hear This
Please don’t tell WONY that I stole this record from them.

119. Hanson - Now Hear This

Please don’t tell WONY that I stole this record from them.